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composite floors that have a tendency to not hold up to helicopter vibrations. The tail spar is also different, so the AD/SB (Airworthiness Directive 99-25-12 / Service Bulletin SW-18-29R1)
that has come out on many of the U.S. Hueys is not applicable
to the German birds. Also, all of the German birds have composite main rotors. The benefit includes a 10,000-hour service
life versus 2,400 hours for the metal blade Hueys."
The UH-1H was essentially the Bell Model 205 with a 1,400
shp Lycoming T53-L-13 engine. Its pitot tube was relocated
from the nose to the roof of the cockpit to prevent damage. All
the rotable parts (blades, heads, gearboxes, etc.) of the German UH-1 D are OEM Bell parts.
"We purchased this helicopter from a company in California (Rice Aircraft Services) who was importing them to be
updated and sold to foreign militaries, and to be put right back
to work," LaFollette said. "They had bought a number of them
and decided to try selling a few in the U.S. market. After a lot
of negotiations, we struck a deal and (c/n) 8206 was put back
together."
The Huey had been shipped from Germany in a container.
Following reassembly, LaFollette revealed, "It was test flown,
and that was it. We elected to have it painted in its current
colors - gray camo, tiger stripe pattern. The light gray is used
on current Marine Hueys." The U.S. Marine Corps operates the
UH-1Y Venom, a twin-engine version, also called Super Huey
and Yankee. It is the Marine Corps' standard utility helicopter
and was still in full-rate production in 2018.
Ferry flight from California to Ohio
LaFollette recounted the first U.S. cross-country flight of
N8379R and its subsequent panel upgrade: "The cockpit, minus the German military equipment, consisted of steam gauges
and a single VHF comm with barely a transponder. We picked
it up in California and flew it back to Columbus, Ohio, in June
2018. What a trip that was. Four days and 25 hours later, it's
on the ramp at its new home. I equate that experience to riding
across the U.S. on a Harley, one that should be experienced by
all. Navigating across the U.S. with basically an iPad, it quickly
became obvious that to keep operating in today's modern
airspace, we needed an avionics upgrade."
Finding the right fit for an avionics retrofit was the next step.
"I interviewed a tremendous number of avionics shops," LaFollette said. "Matt at Gardner avionics was the only one who
generally seemed excited and brought his own ideas to the
table. We dropped it off with them in January 2019 and rolled
it out the door just in time for Sun-n-Fun on April 4. The owner
elected to equip the helicopter with the latest and greatest, and
we decided to remove the old wiring and systems that were no
longer being used."

Tracing Huey's past
What is known about this particular helicopter's past service
is limited, but 71+46 did have a role with the German Air Force,
or Luftwaffe - literally translated as "air weapon." In congruence with Huntoon's remarks, other UH-1 D examples are still
used today by the German Air Force serving a SAR role. These
"Dornier" UH-1s all flew with a cross insignia - the Bundeswehr
Kreuz - on their tail displaying their ship number. LaFollette
noted, "The UH-1 Ds are slowly being retired, and once they
are parked for good, they are auctioned off and sold to the
highest bidder."
Records show 71+46 was registered in Germany and
stationed at Nörvenich Air Base in November 1991. Nörvenich
has historically been home to the German Tactical Air Force
Wing 31, or Taktisches Luftwaffengeschwader 31. Photos of
the helicopter with the markings "KFOR" suggest it had a role
with the Kosovo Force, a NATO-led international peacekeeping
command founded in June 1999, in the autonomous region of
southeastern Europe. The Huey was later located in Schwechat, Austria, at Vienna International Airport in May 2008. Here
it still bore the German flag, KFOR and 71+46 markings. The
Huey arrived at Rice Aircraft Services in Olivehurst, California,
in 2018.
About the UH-1 Huey helicopter
Developed by Texas-based Bell Helicopter to meet a United
States Army's 1952 requirement for medical evacuation and
utility use, the UH-1 was produced from 1956 to 1987. Though
commonly known as the "Huey," a nickname derived from its
original, later-transposed designation HU-1, the helicopter was
also identified as the Iroquois - a name borrowed from the
North American Indian tribe founded by the "Great Peacemaker." The Huey's entangled role as both utility/military workhorse
and peacemaker resonates appropriately, despite the obvious
paradox.
The Huey was the first turbine helicopter produced for the
U.S. military. It is powered by a single turboshaft engine with
two-blade main and tail rotors. Recognizable for the sound it
makes when flying, the two-bladed design gives the Huey its
characteristic "thump," particularly evident during descent and
bank maneuvers. More than 16,000 Hueys were built, and
many continue to operate worldwide today.
UH-1 variants
Model number UH-1A was assigned to the first 100 production models. Follow-on UH-1B models were equipped with
a more-powerful engine and a longer cabin. The UH-1C ad-

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Table of Contents for the Digital Edition of AEA Pilot's Guide 2020-2021

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AEA Pilot's Guide 2020-2021 - Cover3
AEA Pilot's Guide 2020-2021 - Cover4
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